Earlysville Farmers Market extends season availability!

apples H pumpkins more eggs more pumps

Our vendors have decided to continue the market for as long as possible.  If our customers keep cominguick , are satisfied with what we offer, and the snow is not too deep, nor the temperature too prohibitive, a few of the vendors will continue to set up in the Parish Hall parking lot where we have been during the 2015 season.

We do have the freedom to set up in the Parish Hall building if the weather does pose a problem.

We should have pumpkins, gourds, apples, root vegetables, grass fed beef and chicken, sweet quick breads and other baked goods. Count on seeing relishes, pickles, salsa and jams as well.  We must not forget our EGGS, lots of eggs!

National Farmers Market Week | Farmers Market Coalition


Farmers Markets Preserve Farmland and Rural Livelihoods

What comes to mind when you think about a farmer? For many Americans, farmers exemplify the fundamental essence of our nation’s core values. Entrepreneurship. Industry. Self-sufficiency. Innovation. It’s difficult to understand how anyone who possesses these qualities could find themselves struggling to sustain their livelihood – especially when that livelihood produces what everyone in this country needs everyday: food.

Yet according to the USDA, from 1992 to 2007, 21% of mid-sized farms in the U.S. have seen the fruit of their labor fail and go out of business. In this challenging climate dominated by large corporations, small farmers – most notably young and new farmers – are doing everything they can to maintain a thriving business and keep their livelihood from going belly-up. A 2012 USDA agriculture census illuminated a sobering statistic about the future of farming: there are almost 4 times as many U.S. farmers are over the age of 65 as there are under the age of 35.

However, for the young, new and experienced farmers alike, there is a rapidly growing light at the end of the tunnel in the form of farmers markets. Over the past decade, the increasing demand for fresh, local food has sparked the exponential growth of farmers markets nationwide, while serendipitously expanding the opportunity for small farming enterprises to enter the market, take root and grow. Farmers markets are proving to be the ideal venue for new and young entrepreneurs to cultivate a small, burgeoning business.

So, how are farmers markets supporting small and mid-size farmers?

  • Small-scale farmers use farmers markets as incubators for new enterprises and gain real-time feedback on new crops and varieties.
  • Small and mid-size farmers who sell at farmers markets have nearly a 10 percent greater chance of staying in business than those selling goods through traditional channels.
  • Even small community markets are champions of farmland preservation and farm viability; Georgia’s Lilburn Farmers Market gives 10 farmers an opportunity to grow produce on 500 acres of farmland.
  • Eighty percent of farmers market vendors in Iowa, New York, and California said that farmers markets offer them a greater opportunity for business development than any other possible marketing outlet.
  • The seven Seattle farmers markets hosted by the Neighborhood Farmers Market Alliance support 9,491 acres of farmland in diversified production.
  • There are 3.5 times as many U.S. farmers over the age of 65 as there are under 35. Farmers markets provide one of the only low-barrier entry points for new farmers, allowing them to start small as they learn and test the market.
  • 16% of farmers selling at farmers markets are under 35 and 43% have farmed for less than 10 These rates are twice the national rates for all farmers according to the 2012 Ag Census.
  • 50% of farmers selling at farmers markets derive at least half their revenue from farmers market sales.
  • The number of farmers markets operating in winter months has nearly tripled since 2010. The 2,469 markets open in the winter provide an extended opportunity for farmers to do business.

Farmers markets are paving the way for a new generation of farmers – a time-honored profession vital to the preservation of America’s rich farmland and our intrinsic ability to enjoy fresh, local food. What’s more American than your local, small farmer? Let’s just say the runners-up are baseball and apple pie.

Independence Day parade in Earlysville

Our vendors from Sylvanaqua Farms will be participating in the Earlysville July 4th community parade.  They’ll be decorating Chris’s truck with all things farm related including our farmers market signs.  Hopefully we will be able to share a few photos from the event.

Stay tuned!

The distraction of some social media takes it’s toll on the creative aspects of blogging and veggie talk!

It’s been about month since my last market post. It’s not that we don’t have much to say but we can easily and quickly convey progress and information on our FB page. Unfortunate! FB has it’s place in the communication world since it keeps things fast and short but it’s too easy and quick!  I remember deriving so much pleasure out of creating a blog post, honing it, searching for the best descriptive words while announcing the latest market news.   I really must return regularly to this medium to expand on our market news!

John's juicy peaches

John’s tasty peaches


Savi selling her soothing salve

Savi selling her soothing salve


local blueberries

local blueberries


The weather has been hot and humid but thus far we have escaped the usual storms and rain that have plagued us in previous years.    Whatever the afternoon brings us, we do hope it brings us the smiling friendly faces of our steady customers.    The season is humming along  becoming more plentiful each week, filling up the vendor tables with wonderful choices for you.

Stop by.  We’ll be ever so glad to see ya!


June is Bustin’ Out All Over …..

It’s June .. let us all bust out in song:

“All =
Look around! Look around! Look ‘around!

Nettie =
June is bustin’ out all over
All over the meadow and the hill!
Buds’re bustin’ outa bushes
And the rompin’ river pushes
Ev’ry little wheel that wheels beside the mill!

June is bustin’ out all over
The feelin’ is gettin’ so intense,
That the young Virginia creepers
Hev been huggin’ the bejeepers
Outa all the mornin’ glories on the fence!
Because it’s June…

All =
June, June, June
Just because it’s June, June, June!”

A beautiful song, lyrics and musical, “Carousel”, Rodgers and Hammerstein …..

Yes, it’s June and week 5 of the market.  The first 2 weeks brought out familiar and new faces to our market and the pace aroused the hope of a terrific season.  We took a chance one week before opening day and reestablished ourselves under the canopy of trees in the Buck Mtn Parish Hall parking lot.  As it turns out, as fate will have it, it remains a better fit for our ever fluid market.

I think we shall now consider it home.  And ….

June, June, June is bustin’ out all over.   We happily welcome back Harold, John, Chris and Annie of Sylvanaqua Farms, Rose of Buck Mtn Farm, Samara of Lettuce Grow Farm, Karen with Rocky Road Produce, Ben’s Baked Goods, Little Neva’s Bakery and The Roper Family.  New thus far this season are Priya and Savi.    We are merry!      AND …

mkt5.28.15So June is bustin’ out, the vendors may bust out in song, our veggies, fruit, local beef, chicken and pork barbecue are bustin’ out along with Jammie Cookies, Madeleines, quick breads, vegetarian cuisine, EGGS, plants and so much more to bust out!

Week 3 coming up … pictures are forthcoming!

We are having a ton of fun at the Earlysville Farmers Market. 10 vendors thus far, 5 of which have fresh and local produce primarily. Beef, chicken, ham, pork barbecue, vegetarian cuisine and chutneys. Dinner is definitely doable. So swing on in the parking lot at Buck Mountain Episcopal Church Parish Hall parking lot. Stroll through our merry marketeers and let your imagination run wild with dinner plans.

You’ll find dessert also, of course, Cookies, cakes, sweet breads, madeleines, apples, if you’d rather skip the prepared dessert and go simple.

Come by! You just never know what you’ll discover beyond a great time!!

It’s time for Pizza…..No-Knead Pizza Crust: King Arthur Flour

Everyone love pizza, I think.  Just watching an ad for pizza on TV makes me crave it.   We’ll have lots more delightful fresh and local veggies from the market soon.   Why not slice up a selection of your finds and put ’em on a homemade pizza.  You can also make a quick sauce from market tomatoes and some fresh basil.  Hey, what about chopped ham, barbecue, grilled chicken for the pizza?   We have these items at the market.  Have fun, be creative.

Use this quick and easy recipe from King Arthur Flour to whip up a delicious pizza for dinner.     For toppings, assembly directions and photos visit the web page:

No-Knead Pizza Crust: King Arthur Flour.


No-knead yeast bread is a trend with legs. No longer a revolution, it’s morphed into evolution: from a simple loaf baked in a Dutch oven, we now have access to recipes for no-knead brioche, cinnamon buns… and pizza crust. Our thanks to Jim Lahey, of New York City’s Sullivan St. Bakery, for the inspiration for this version of no-knead pizza.

We add Hi-maize fiber to up the fiber in this pizza “invisibly;” no one will ever know they’re eating a high-fiber pizza. But leave it out if you like, substituting bread flour for the 1/2 cup of Hi-maize.

Finally, this is not your typical thin-crisp or soft-chewy crust. It’s somewhere in between; thin in spots, thicker in others, with crackly-hard edges and lots of chew. this is definitely crust you have to “grip and rip;” an adult-type crust, probably not suitable for little kids.

Read our blog about this pizza, with additional photos, at Flourish.




  • your favorite pizza toppings